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 Post subject: Kicking it old school
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 1:21 am 
Just to check and see if anyone reads the older stuff around here, what's your favorite work of fiction over 50 years old?

My personal fav would have to be Beat to Quarters by C.F. Forester


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 2:06 am 
T S Eliot's The Waste Land. 8-) I'll show YOU fear in a handful of dust!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 2:11 am 
* plugs The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson again

And 1984 and Animal Farm, both by George Orwell.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 2:27 am 
Woapalanne wrote:
T S Eliot's The Waste Land. 8-) I'll show YOU fear in a handful of dust!

You LIKED those 850 lines of insanity?

/me still has a headache from the last time he read it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 7:28 am 
Ditto, Ger, on 1984 and Animal Farm. :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 12:04 pm 
DT. It's 850 lines of insanity. What's NOT to like? ;)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 1:53 pm 
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Time Machine was pretty darn good.

20,000 Leagues was absolutely amazing.

1984 and Animal Farm both are definitely stories to read and remember, and most importantly, to remember that they are *NOT* instruction manuals kthx.

But I think my favorite old fiction would have to be the Sherlock Holmes stories. Amazing work.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 3:52 pm 
"A Conneticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court" by Mark Twain was excellent.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 6:36 pm 
Wow. Good question.

Kipling, but /which/ poem? So many excellent choices.
Or... or.. Blake and his wackiness. Or Coleridge's drugged stupor of a pleasure dome or albatross-phobia. Or the first known novel - Beowulf. Or the first surviving literary pun, in Homer's Odyssey.

There are So Many Choices!

Let's go with Kipling's "Oont". Just cuz.

-John


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2004 6:42 pm 
Ogredude wrote:
1984 and Animal Farm both are definitely stories to read and remember, and most importantly, to remember that they are *NOT* instruction manuals kthx.


...they're not?

8O

*scraps those plans


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 1:02 am 
Is Asimov's work 50 years old yet?

*Runs to shelf to check*

Yes! Than practicaly any of Asimov's earlier works are good. Also, although it sort of goes with out saying The Lord of the Rings is good (I think it is 50 years old, at least the first part is. Did he publish Return of the King before or after 1954? It escapes me.)

I actualy really like some of Steinbeck's work as well, especialy Of Mice and Men.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 1:08 am 
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Energizer Bunny
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Joined: Wed May 22, 2002 12:24 am
Posts: 1634
Copyright is counted from the author's death. Asimov died in 1992. Tolkien died in 1973. Neither of those dates are 50 years ago. Or 75 years ago.

Vorn


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 1:13 am 
Vorn the Unspeakable wrote:
Copyright is counted from the author's death. Asimov died in 1992. Tolkien died in 1973. Neither of those dates are 50 years ago. Or 75 years ago.

Vorn


The original copyright date is also in the information on the back of the title page.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 1:26 am 
Huh? When did copyright come into the convo?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 10:31 am 
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Energizer Bunny
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Joined: Wed May 22, 2002 12:24 am
Posts: 1634
I got confused about something. Nemmind.

Vorn


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 9:04 pm 
Oggy said "kthx". I am terrified. :cry:

Oh, La familia de Pascual Duarte is pretty dang good, too. It's sorta like Hamlet. Only everybody dies FASTER. And the main character really IS utterly insane.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2004 10:28 pm 
What's that in english Woap? It sounds familiar.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2004 12:46 pm 
Both Orwell choices are great, but I'll go with Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 (1953).


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2004 1:24 pm 
Dark_Tiger wrote:
Just to check and see if anyone reads the older stuff around here, what's your favorite work of fiction over 50 years old?


The Grapes of Wrath.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2004 1:24 pm 
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Official Village Idiot
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Posts: 822
Location: Room L, Hotel Raffles, Luna City
The Foundation trilogy. The later books weren't bad, but they neither have the same feel as the first three nor are 50 years old yet. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a close second.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 2:01 am 
Dark_Tiger wrote:
What's that in english Woap? It sounds familiar.


The Family of Pascual Duarte. Spanish novel. I translated it if you want to read it.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2004 2:52 pm 
Animal wrote:
Dark_Tiger wrote:
Just to check and see if anyone reads the older stuff around here, what's your favorite work of fiction over 50 years old?


The Grapes of Wrath.

You mean somebody actually likes this book? 8O

My fave is probably The Scarelt Pimpernel


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:56 pm 
Maveric wrote:
Animal wrote:
Dark_Tiger wrote:
Just to check and see if anyone reads the older stuff around here, what's your favorite work of fiction over 50 years old?


The Grapes of Wrath.

You mean somebody actually likes this book? 8O


It is ok. Definitely not his best, but I have read worse.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2004 5:49 pm 
Asimov rocks. He is one of my favorite authors ever.

And for some reason Animal is the first person to agree with me that The Grapes of Wrath is a good book.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2004 8:49 pm 
Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
Crazy fantasy written by a mathematician.
By the way, the answer to the hatter's riddle is, "Because the both make notes, although they are flat."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2004 9:02 pm 
MaskedHuzzah wrote:
Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
Crazy fantasy written by a mathematician.
By the way, the answer to the hatter's riddle is, "Because the both make notes, although they are flat."


I'd always heard it was "Poe wrote on both."

Incidentally, did you know he (Charles Dodgson AKA Lewis Caroll) was very fond of children... in a... certain... way?
Nevertheless, they're good books. He was a great poet.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2004 7:30 am 
MaskedHuzzah wrote:
Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
Crazy fantasy written by a mathematician.
By the way, the answer to the hatter's riddle is, "Because the both make notes, although they are flat."

You mean "Why is a raven like a writing desk?" I've always preferred the answer "Poe wrote on both." :)

Edit: Apparently I've been beaten to the punch.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2004 10:55 am 
MaskedHuzzah wrote:
Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
Crazy fantasy written by a mathematician.


Ooooh.

By the by, love the signature. That song rocks.

Okay... need to keep this on-topic...

Uh... The Time Machine by H.G. Wells is also goody.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 12:36 pm 
The early Heinlein short stories. By His Bootstraps, And Built A Crooked House and of course there is always Lifeline.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 1:30 am 
I really liked Silas Marner by George Eliot. It was a nice, touching story that I probably enjoyed more than I should have. Except for the unnecessary bar scene that dragged on for 20 hours.


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