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 Post subject: A lightsaber I built.
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 3:45 am 
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Posts: 1134
Location: Idaho
http://members.ispwest.com/gregg1/light ... saber1.jpg

http://members.ispwest.com/gregg1/light ... saber2.jpg

Any questions?

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Fandemonium!
August 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 2014

"I am a machine. I am a weapon of war. I am a destroyer of life in the service of life, the sword and shield of my human creators." Bolo Invincibilus, Mark XXIII, Model B (Experimental) 0075-NKE "Nike".


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 5:16 am 
Yes. What did you use and where can I get the materials I need to build one myself?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 7:36 am 
Does it actually work?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 7:13 pm 
Why did you post it in this forum? This is for fics. Please post in the appropriate forum. Moving.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 9:35 pm 
This site has a few lightsaber hilt plans. They're using mostly common hardware so it shouldn't be too hard to put something together.

And yes, they work well as cool looking props and possably also as bludgeons.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 12:07 am 
But the actual sword made of light part, does that work? If it does then you are now god. (if only lightsabers were not theoretically impossibly to build!)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 3:34 am 
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Maveric wrote:
Why did you post it in this forum? This is for fics. Please post in the appropriate forum. Moving.


Maveric, Fish Stories is not just for stories, but for any fandom related artwork. I told bizzy to post this there as the most appropriate forum in the Zoo.

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(Idaho: It ain't just potatoes anymore.)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 9:38 pm 
Ah, I understand now. Sorry about that.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 10:33 pm 
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Location: Idaho
Parts used:

High pressure (0.06" wall) copper plumbing pipe. Exactly 1" inside diameter. Lighter weight pipe has a larger inside diameter.

Galvanized steel chainlink fence top-rail tubing. .999" outside diameter after polishing and buffing.

1/2" nominal size light duty copper pipe. Inside diameter is 0.55" with a 0.035" wall.

The nuts from a large brass plumbing coupler. (The type with a bit of copper pipe between the nuts.)

A small piece of 6061-T6 1/2" thick aluminum plate.

Two 3/4" long 1/8" diameter pop-rivets.

A 1" long piece of 60601-T6 aluminum 1" round bar. (Can't bee seen, it's the part of the pommel that's pressed into the hilt to hold it in place.)

25 feet of 16ga bare copper wire.

Two pieces of a 1.33" outside diameter PVC plumbing coupler.

One 8-32 brass thumbscrew, 3/8" thread length.

A chunk of edge connector from an ISA slot PC soundcard.

Lead-free solder.

Super glue and clear paint in a spray can. Dupli-Color "Metalcast" silver basecoat was used on the inside of the emitter guard.

Tools used:

Harbor Freight #42976 12-Speed Drill/Mill.

Homier #03911 7x12 Metal Lathe with a #43581 4-jaw chuck from Harbor Freight.

An older Grizzly Industrial 7x10 metal lathe with its stock 3-jaw chuck. Really old, serial #346. I had to do a ton of work on it to repair damage from previous owners and to correct the numerous flaws the early Chinese import lathes had. By comparison, my Homier lathe was practically perfect when it arrived on my doorstep.

A quickchange toolpost like this one but purchased from Homier. (They don't seem to stock it now.)

A 4x6 metal cutting bandsaw similar to this one, but several years older, made in Taiwan or Japan instead of China. ;)

A BernzOMatic propane torch.

A Dremel multi-tool with cutoff wheel and grindstone.

A Harbor Freight #47257 6" Digital Caliper.

A buffer made from one of those old "butt shaker" machines that had the strap that went around your backside or belly. Remove the eccentric cams off the ends and replace with threaded stub arbors to mount buffing wheels. The reduction belt drive slows down the speed to perfect for metal polishing and buffing.

An ordinary hacksaw plus various drill bits, endmills, an 8-32 thread tap and handle, lathe toolbits, flat and round files, various grits of sandpaper,
time, sweat, and fortunately- no blood. ;)

The emitter and guard are held on by the brass thumbscrew and the pommel could be removed fairly easily. It's now fitted with a homemade D-Ring. Actually, an Ogredude's shop-made D-ring. We did that right before going to see the movie, so I should include a Shopsmith Mark V in drillpress mode in the tools list. ;)

Should you decide to get yourself a small metal lathe, I highly reccommend checking out these two websites. http://www.mini-lathe.com and http://www.littlemachineshop.com

The "7x" lathes are quite nice, and even better after you've gone over them and tweaked and adjusted things. They're like a small big lathe instead of like a large small lathe like a Unimat or Prazi or Taig. (And also much, much less expensive!) Harbor-Freight is the only company selling the 7x10 which is 10" maximum between centers. Everyone else like Homier or Cummins Industrial Tools sells a 7x12 which is 12" maximum between the face of the 3-jaw chuck and the tailstock center. A 3" 4-jaw chuck is a bit thinner so it can hold slightly longer work. Measured like a 7x10 (between centers) the 7x12 can hold work nearly 14" long. Micro Mark sells a 7x14 (between chuck and tailstock) lathe but it's the most expensive of the 7x Chinese import lathes available in the USA.

For a person just doing small stuff, the Harbor Freight #47158 Micro Mill takes up less room, costs less and unlike the "Big Red" drill/mill, doesn't have a round column so it keeps alignment when the head is raised/lowered.

I'm on this Yahoo Group which is the most active one there is for the home shop machinist. It's so active because it is totally unmoderated. We will get into discussions about ANYTHING. Should you choose to join, ASK A QUESTION about machine tools and machining. We can't read your mind, so being a lurker won't get you anywhere. ;) You'll get plenty of answers. Many of the members are 60-70-80 years old with a lifetime of expertise and willing to help out anyone new to metalwork.

_________________
Fandemonium!
August 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 2014

"I am a machine. I am a weapon of war. I am a destroyer of life in the service of life, the sword and shield of my human creators." Bolo Invincibilus, Mark XXIII, Model B (Experimental) 0075-NKE "Nike".


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